What Causes Teeth to Chip?


Posted on 6/30/2019 by Dr. Leary
What Causes Teeth to Chip?Weak teeth are more likely to chip than when your teeth are strong. There are many culprits that can cause your teeth to grow weak. Some of these things occur more frequently than others. Some are also easier to avoid than others.

Common Causes of Chipped Teeth


When you bite down on a hard piece of food (e.g. candy, ice), it's easy to chip your tooth. While this is something you can choose to avoid doing, you can't help it when you fall or get into a car accident and chip your tooth. Another example of a way in which teeth are easily chipped is during contact sports.

You'll want to make sure you wear a mouth guard when you play things like hockey, karate, football, or go skiing. On the other side of the spectrum, another example of how you can chip your teeth in a way that can't easily be controlled by you is if you grind your teeth while you're sleeping. These are all some of the most common ways teeth are chipped today.

Additional Risk Factors for Chipped Teeth


It's important to pay attention to the food you eat. Anything that produces a lot of acid or causes you to experience heartburn can bring stomach acid into your mouth. When this happens, you can damage your tooth enamel. This is also true if you vomit frequently because you have an eating disorder, or you drink too much alcohol.

Another food that's important to pay attention to is sugar. It will produce bacteria inside your mouth. Once there, these bacteria will start to attack your enamel.

Of course, tooth enamel will also naturally wear down over time. This means that if you're in your fifties or older you are more likely to have weak tooth enamel than someone who's younger than you. This will also increase the likelihood of you chipping your teeth easier.

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